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Patients & Visitors For Professionals LEAN Academy

Nationally Ranked Locally Trusted | (303) 436-6000

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Contact Public Health Pharmacy

Contact Us

Public Health Pharmacy
Phone: 303-602-8762
Fax: 303-602-3588
PHPharmacy@dhha.org
605 Bannock St., 5th Floor
Denver, CO 80204
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Hours of Operation
Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Medication Safety Tips

Where to Keep your Medicines

  • In a cool dry place that will help remind you to take them.
  • NOT in the sun, the bathroom or the car.
  • Ritonavir (Norvir) capsules will melt if the temperature is above 70°.
  • Away from children and other family members.

What to Ask the Pharmacist

  • What each medicine is for.
  • ANY questions you have about your medicines such as:
    • If my pills look different, are they the same?
    • Why did you change my dose when my care provider didn’t say anything about a different dose?
    • Why is the name on the bottle different from what my care provider said?

Interactions

  • Many drugs interact with other prescription medications, over-the-counter medications and food. Be sure to ask your pharmacist about potential interactions.

Important Reminders

  • Know the names of your medicines.
    • Most medicines have at least two names (the generic name and the brand or trade name).
  • Have a list of all your medicines with you at all times.
    • Your care provider should give you a list of medicines every time there is a change.
    • You can ask your care provider or the pharmacist for a list of your medicines at any time.
  • Tell your care provider and pharmacist about the following.
    • Vitamins, supplements and other medicines you take.
    • Any allergies you have to medicines and the reaction (rash, breathing problems, stomach ache, etc.).

Keeping Track of Your Medications

It can be difficult to take many different kinds of medication. The pharmacy can help when you have a complicated combination of medicines. “Medicine on Time” is a system that puts all of the pills that you are supposed to take at the same time into one section of a blister pack (a pre-formed plastic package with a foil backing) to make it easier for you to manage. Ask your care provider or the pharmacy about this service.